Lanzarote

24 02 2014

The Canary Islands are a very popular tourist spot for many Europeans and lie 100 – 200 km off the west coast of Africa just about in line with Agadir in Morocco. Despite that I have never visited them and haven’t really felt a need to do so. However, as I didn’t do my yearly trip to New Zealand this year I thought that it would be nice to get away for some sun. I spent quite a few hours researching places in the Caribbean, Oman, UAE, Cape Verde with the view to finding a country that I haven’t cached in before and some warm weather. Did I mention cost? It had to be reasonably priced and that quickly put paid to the notion of a week or two in the Caribbean.

Oman, the UAE and the Cape Verde Islands fell away as well as they were quite limiting in what could be done apart from lying on a beach. Caches were more or less non-existant anywhere close to the tourist spots as well. That brought me back to the Canary Islands and on the recommendation of my brothers and other people the choice fell on Lanzarote. A nice warm dry place to counteract the Swedish winter. Or so I thought.

The Canary Islands belong to Spain so I couldn’t add a new geoaching country to my list, but due to the volcanic nature of the island there were a few interesting earthcaches to find. Otherwise the number of caches on the island was very limited, just a mere 114 caches on the island.

As the island is so small, around 60 km from north to south I only rented a car for two days knowing full well, that as my partner was with me, geocaching would not be in focus. As it turned out we found just a measly seven caches, three of them on foot from the hotel. The traditional caches were nothing to report on but the earthcaches were all at memorable places.

Salinas de Janubio

Salt pans at Salinas de Janubio

Salt pans at Salinas de Janubio

The sea beyond the lagoon that became Salinos de Janubio

The sea beyond the lagoon that became Salinos de Janubio

Los Hervideros

Rough sea at the basalt cliffs of Los Hervideros

Rough sea at the basalt cliffs of Los Hervideros

Great danger sign

Great danger sign

A lava tube near Los Hervideros that opened to daylight as a large cave

A lava tube near Los Hervideros that opened to daylight as a large cave

El Diabolo

View over Timanfaya obscured by rain

View over Timanfaya obscured by rain

Timanfaya in the rain

Timanfaya in the rain

Rippled pattern on a flow of lava

Rippled pattern on a flow of lava

Jameos del Agua

Water filled part of the lava tube at Jameos del Agua

Water filled part of the lava tube at Jameos del Agua

Looking up from inside the lava tube at Jameos del Agua

Looking up from Jameos del Agua

As for the warm dry place we were expecting to visit, it turned out to be cool (15C) and wet. It rained more or less continuously for two days and we had showers on the remaining days. At least it was a break from work and we got to see some rather unusual rugged and harsh scenery. I have walked over a volcanic area in New Zealand called Tongariro but that was basically just one large (and still active) volcano rather than the dozens of volcanos we saw here.

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