2017 in retrospect.

11 01 2018

It’s time to recap on my previous year of geocaching. I have been caching at about the same level for the past four years so there is no big difference there. The main change has been the virtually complete lack of activity in the latter quarter of the year. Even though I attended FAD and a few related caches in Uppsala at the beginning of November (where I had a great time) I still didn’t even manage to find a dozen caches in the quarter. Let’s see if 2018 will be a more active year.

The graphs below show my finds performance per month, by type, by difficulty/terrain and by country.

Finds by month.

My best month this year was April and virtually all of those caches were found on a trip to the Isle of Man where my brother (half of Zelger) came with me for the pleasant trek across the island.

Finds by type.


Of note here is that I attended my first mega event after over fourteen years of active geocaching. It was, as already mentioned, Fumble After Dark (FAD) which is a darkness oriented event (of course – considering the short number of hours of daylight we get in November). Another item of note is that 20% of my finds were mystery caches! Over the whole time I have been caching mystery caches have accounted for just 8% of the total.

Finds by difficulty/terrain.

As expected there is a skew to the top left sector of the table and disappointingly no D5’s or T5’s.

Finds by country.

Even though the majority of the finds were in Sweden I did find caches in two new caching countries, namely the Isle of Man and Albania. Tenerife counts as Spain where I have previously found caches.

So that was 2017. What will 2018 bring? Well as I am now in New Zealand I can say that January will probably be the month I have most finds and as I have already solved over 100 mystery caches the percentage for January will no doubt be even higher than the figure for 2017.

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My targets for 2016

21 11 2015

One of the fun things about geocaching, apart from being out hunting for caches, is the background work with the statistics. I know I am not alone on this. I also find that having some targets to aim for make the experience more fun. In earlier years it has been easier to add the standard targets that all geocachers seem to have, like finding a cache on all days of the year or all D/T combinations. Once all that is done it gets tricker and more individual.

Some of my earlier targets are listed here
Targets 2010
Targets 2011
Targets 2014
Targets 2015

My targets for 2016 don’t differ an awful lot from those of 2015. Can they be met or will I fail again like I did last year? The answer will be seen at the end of the year of course!

1. Find at least one cache in Norrland

2. Find at least one cache in 10 new boroughs of Sweden

3. Find caches in at least 3 more countries.

4. Find at least 10 more earthcaches

5. Place at least 3 new caches with different D/T ratings or types

6. Find puzzle caches to complete the A-Z, 0-9 owner challenge.

7. Find ten new D/T combinations for puzzle caches.





My targets for 2015

22 12 2014

The year isn’t over yet so I am still hunting caches albeit at a slower pace. What I am doing is preparing for 2015 where of course I have decided that I need to set new targets. They are summarised below, and what I am trying to do now is related to target No 7. I don’t want to get to December 2015 and find it’s a really tough cold and snow rich winter, so it’s better to hunt for caches now as it is still virtually snow free here in Gästrikland. All being well I will end up with just one date to fill in December.

1. Find caches in all regions in Sweden
2. Find caches in 10 new counties of Sweden
3. Find caches in at least 3 more countries.
4. Find at least 10 more earthcaches
5. Place at least 3 new caches with different D/T ratings or types
6. Find puzzle caches to complete the A-Z, 0-9 owner challenge.
7. Complete the second round of the dates of the year challenge.
8. Complete the D/T matrix for puzzle caches.

I need to find a cache on each of the higlighted dates!

I need to find a cache on each of the higlighted dates!


Apart from that the targets are probably not too challenging except for No 6 and that’s just because there are not so many cachers with names starting with numerals!

So how did I do in 2014? Well, the year is not yet over so it will be a couple of weeks before I know.





Geocaching finds in European countries

3 07 2014

I have to give credit to Hallén as I got the idea from his blog <a href="http://hallensgeocachingaventyr.com/ and thought that it was a good idea to show a "before" and "after" picture round our last European trip where three new geocaching countries were added to the map.

Before our CEE trip

Before our CEE trip

After our CEE trip

After our CEE trip

There are still many “white” spots on the map so I have plenty of opportunities ahead of me over the next few years.





San Francisco – Highway 1 – Los Angeles

4 10 2013

Phew! This is the final posting on our trip to USA. It’s taken me a while to write as I have been busy at both work and home since we returned. As the main goals of the trip to USA were all fulfilled the last couple of days in California were more geared to sightseeing. To recap, the main points of interest for the vacation trip were.

– Find a cache that was placed in October 2000 so I could complete the Jasmer challenge.
– Visit the Grand Canyon as that has been on my wish list for the past 50 or more years.
– Do some of the ET Highway power trail.
– Do some of the Route 66 power trail.

As always I try to keep some kind of statistics for my geocaching. This is the result from the 2 weeks we were in USA as shown by a simple GSAK macro.

Find statistics for the trip

Find statistics for the trip

We found caches in four new states: California, Nevada, Arizona and Utah, which if course gave new geocaching souvenirs.

August was the month for the geocaching “31 days of Geocaching” streak challenge and even if I hadn’t intended to hunt for a cache on every day we did pretty well during the time we were in USA. We did alright between the sixth and the sixteenth but failed on the 17th which was International Geocaching day, so there I missed getting two souvenirs, for what that’s worth. I ended up at the end of August with twenty one souvenirs out of thirty two possible so I was happy enough with that.

After spending a couple of days in San Francisco we headed out on Highway 1 towards a planned overnight stay in San Luis Obispo and a final night close to Los Angeles before flying home. When I did the same trip in April 1991 the weather was fantastic. Now, in August we were hit by fog for the first hour but then it cleared up as we headed south.

A foggy start to our drive on Highway 1

A foggy start to our drive on Highway 1

Monterey - Cannery Row, made imortal in John Steinbacks novels

Monterey – Cannery Row, made imortal in John Steinbacks novels

Bixby Creek Bridge

Bixby Creek Bridge

Highway 1 just south of Bixby Bridge

Highway 1 just south of Bixby Bridge

Highway 1 cliffs

Highway 1 cliffs

Highway 1 island

Highway 1 island

We didn’t stop to look for any caches until we reached San Luis Obispo. We discovered when we arrived that it was the evening of the weekly Farmers Market so we hade a very pleasant evening in the town that included a couple of great beers in the local microbrewery being served by a beautiful girl. Now, that doesn’t happen so often.

Beautiful girl in SLO

Beautiful girl in SLO

San Luis Obispo brewer

San Luis Obispo brewer

We also saw a couple of good music acts, a drama in the form of a person needing ambulance aid in the middle of the crowded street and some great street life including a walk up Bubblegum Alley.

Bubblegum alley in San Luis Obispo. Colourful but gross!

Bubblegum alley in San Luis Obispo. Colourful but gross!

We took an early morning walk from the hotel and found the two nearby caches of 1903 Gasworks and Mitchell & Judson before leaving for the continued journey south.

We stopped a couple more times where we found a virtual Big Fig

Gigantic fig tree

Gigantic fig tree


and two earthcaches.

Tar Pits Park

Tar Sands

Tar Sands

The tar pits were quite amazing. Watching tar oozing out of the ground was quite a sight, one that I have never seen before. Even the mammoth skeleton was amazing.

Pygmy Mammoths of the Channel Islands NP

Pygmy mammoth

Pygmy mammoth

Finally on our last couple of hours before returning the rental car we took a little detour through Hollywood where we had to see the walk of fame. Just a couple of the many stars are depicted below.

Alfred Hitchcock was one of many stars

Alfred Hitchcock was one of many stars

Ann-Margret is one of the handful of Swedes that has a star on the boulevard

Ann-Margret is one of the handful of Swedes that has a star on the boulevard

All in all we had a memorable two weeks in the west of USA and all because I needed to find a cache placed in October 2000 so I could complete the Jasmer Challenge.





Ten years after – addendum.

13 04 2013

Zero degrees and horizontal sleet is what faced us on Saturday morning as we drove down to Uppsala. The main mission of the day, for my partner at least, was to find a pair of shoes for her daughter’s wedding. My mission for the day was twofold; maintain a few of my Upptåg series caches and find two specific caches, more of which later.

A couple of my Upptåg caches had got cache creep. The whole series of caches uses film canisters attached magnetically to gantries at the stations. The ones in Skyttorp and Örbyhus had wandered upwards about 5 meters! Either there are some very tall cachers or those who think that T1 or T1.5 means climbing up a pole. Of course, it didn’t have to be a cacher that had moved the caches. It could have been the local muggles with little better to do. Anyway, they have now been brought down where I intended them to be and the ones with the wet or full logbooks have been attended to.

The other, and perhaps more fun mission was for me to find Challenge – 3 olika cacher av 15 Utläggare, not specifically because I could but because the cache was placed on January 17 (2013) and that was the final date I needed for me to get a full “Placed by date” chart. It’s something that has eluded me for a couple of years! Before I went to New Zealand on holiday this year I had two empty dates and had found two appropriate caches that would allow me to complete the grid. However, I got a DNF on the cache from January 17 and it’s been irritating me since then.

A couple of weeks ago on my trip to Uppsala with Madchicken72, Slas and Ironhawk67 I didn’t have time to work out if I could find this specific challenge cache, even though I logged a few others, but when I started to see if I could meet the requirements I noted the date it was published . Woohoo! Just what I needed.

So thanks to the cachers listed on the screen shots below for placing such a diversity of caches that I could find this Challenge cache and kill two birds with one stone.

Part one of the list for 3 different caches by 15 placers

Part one of the list for 3 different caches by 15 placers

Part two of the list for 3 different caches by 15 placers

Part two of the list for 3 different caches by 15 placers

Of course, the cache I went for afterwards was Challenge #128 – Full Finds by Placed Date Chart The most gratifying part about finding these two caches was that it nicely rounded off my 10 year anniversary of geocaching. It only took me ten years to the day to completely fill in the Placed by date chart. Nice.

Completed "Placed by date" chart

Completed “Placed by date” chart





NZ 2013: Summary

6 03 2013

As with many other geocachers I like statistics. 😉 so here are some to share with you.

379 finds in total in 32 calendar days / 24 caching days

    1. 332 traditional
      4 multi-caches
      26 mysterys
      2 letterbox hybrids
      2 virtuals
      10 earthcaches
      2 events
      1 CITO
  • My main target for the vacation was to find all ten of the oldest caches on the South Island and that has now been done.

    NZSI10Oldest

    Most of the caches were found at the lower end of the D/T matrix but 23 were rated with D or T of three or greater. Last year when I visited New Zealand I found 221 caches of which 30 were rated with D or T of three or great.

    D/T matrix but no completed row or column

    D/T matrix but no completed row or column

    I don’t want to know how far I drove during my stay on the South Island but a good indication can be obtained by looking at a map of my finds.

    379 finds in about a month of hunting

    379 finds in about a month of hunting








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