Flughem

10 05 2017

After a cold start to the month Friday (May 5th) was really warm, with temperatures well over 20 C. It’s not usual for May and the following days have given us snow, freezing nights and cold days. Anyway, as I had looked at the caches at Flughem and worked out the coordinates for ground zero where needed I decided that this would be a great way of spending the afternoon. It was all decided on the spur of the moment so I hadn’t noted much about the area. Forest. That’s roughly what I thought and didn’t expect it to be much different to the rest of the forest in the area. I know that there has been mining activity in the triangle between Hofors, Torsåker and Storvik and many years ago I had read a little about the geology of the area and have visited a few places to see old ruins.

So off I set with GPS, spare batteries, pen and paper, letterbox stamp and pad, plus my old iPhone 4S with the geocaching® app. No water, no coffee and sandwiches, no sunglasses. No mosquito repellant, as it was far too early in the year to need it. I was going to be in the car most of the way and the final few hundred meters were bound to be on easily tramped forest paths!

My first stop wasn’t planned but I saw the multicache icon for Välten vid Lapphagsgruvan and decided to stop and see if I could find the cache. The calculation of the coords for GZ was simple and there were clearly remains of an old mine to explore.

The cache at Lapphagsgruva.

My GPS thought I should examine a wall but luckily the hint was very clear! I dropped off a TB that I had picked up the previous weekend and continued on to Epicentrum which was quickly retrieved.

Between the main road RV68 and Flughem was a mini power trail consisting of ten PET preforms. Nothing special but it’s nice to add numbers to my finds list. The first of the Flughem caches was a simple mystery, but a well composed and interesting one. I really had a laugh when I found the cache. So appropriate. I won’t post a photo here as it will spoil the fun for future visitors. I parked my car at the suggested spot and made my way to the letterbox hybrid at Flughems Kalle. Again this was a well thought out cache and a great container. I never understand why visitors to letterbox hybrids are too lazy to bring a stamp with them. It’s a small investment and makes the logbook much more interesting to look at than just a nick or in best case just the cache’s own stamp.

A well filled cache at Flughems Kalle.

It was now that the real geocaching fun started. In the early days of geoaching regular size containers were placed somewhere out in the forest usually under a rock and you were expected to bush bash to get to them. Sometimes there was a path leading close by. Usually, the path was found once you had reached the cache through bush bashing. I now felt some nostalgia.

The starting point for Vitheten i det lilla korset was quickly located. Behind the cache were the remains of old mining activity. After the reading the cache page and activating a vast array of detecting devices, well my smrtphone and GPS I continued along teh path wondering what would happen. Pip! Data started flowing from out of nowhere and I suddenly knew that I had a few hundred meters walk to the cache.

The white cross at the start of Vitheten i det lilla korset

That’s where the fun started. I didn’t have a paper map with me and the maps on my smartphone and GPS don’t show paths in the forest, so I kept on walking but after a while realised I was heading south and the cache was to the west. I found a track and started following it. Suddenly there was no track just a steep slope strewn with mossy boulders and a fence at the top. I realised I was on the south side of the limestone quarry. I continued on wondering where on earth the cache was going to be. A sweaty twenty minutes later I arrived at GZ. What a view. It was 24 C and a perfect place for a cup of coffee and a sandwich – if I had thought to bring something with me. This shouldn’t be hard I thought, there aren’t too many hiding places. After 20 minutes of futile searching I decided to “phone a friend”. I started with the CO only to find that the number I called had been transferred to someone else. He doesn’t work here any longer. I called Ironhawk67, X_1, Gustafs Lisa, Olleoljud and noone answered. It was then I considered giving up but I made another circuit around GZ. Nothing but mounting frustration. An idea popped into my head. Geocaching app message to the CO. Another circuit, this take anticlockwise around GZ. Yeah! There it was, hiding away under a stone overhang in a bed of moss and heather. Thirty seven minutes of my life had gone into finding the cache. Yes!

The logbook for Vitheten i det lilla korset

Well, as I was here and sweaty but pleased to have finally found the cache I set off up another hill towards Mot Körbergsklack #09 where there was a great view over the surroundings.

The wind shelter at the top of Körbergsklack.

Of course after I found the cache I also found some well defind paths, which made it a lot easier for me to find the next few caches before getting back to the car 47 minutes later (according to my GPS tracklog). Amongst the caches I found were the earthcache Klapperstensfältet vid Körberget, a very old and wizened spruce, that according to the photo in the cache description was quite impressive a century ago Krypgranen vid körbergets fot and a multicache at the limestone quarry Kalkbrottet.

A rather wizened creeping spruce.

I didn’t try to get too close to the edge of the quarry as it seemed to be a long drop down to the water. It was far easier getting back to the car from where I was. I just followed a clearly marked trail and once back in the car, the AC was immediately turned on so I could cool down. I enjoy warm days but this one came as a surprise and I don’t think my body was ready for it. The tracklog and elevation plot from Google Earth show in principle where I stopped on my wander through the forest. The limestone quarry can’t be seen but it’s in the centre of the “circle” that my route took.

Google Earth elevation and speed plot

A walk around Flughem starting at my car to the right and climbing to the highest point at the top left.





BBC, JJEF and FF40

24 04 2017

Once my trip to the Isle of Man and England was known to zelger, he suggested an outing close to his home with a group that he is involved in: WKMU3A. U3A is the abbreviation for University of the third age and is for active people who have retired. WKM is for Wokingham where most live. I am still working but my younger brother and his wife who form “zelger” are both retired. Go figure.

I was given a list of potential walking loops of about 5 km that ended at suitable eating and drinking establishements. One that caught my eye was north of Reading and was a series of 40 mystery caches. I looked at them and found about half to be doable. The rest I just gave up on. That meant I had a list of around twenty caches in nice woodland. However, mysteries are not something that zelger or the WKMU3A group are keen on so the idea was parked.

We arrived at Gatwick after an uneventful flight from Ronaldsway airport on the Isle of Man and took the direct train from Gatwick to Wokingham. It’s very convenient as it completely misses out on having to go into London. zelger had some things to sort out in the afternoon so he sent me off out on the BBC trail. Now, for me BBC stands for British Broadcasting Corporation, but in this case it meant Binfield Bridal Bicycle Circuit and consisted of a mixture of twenty six traditional, mystery and letterbox hybrid caches. zelger thought it was too complicated for them so they had parked it. I thought it was great fun. In the first two caches BBC#1 and #2 were laminated cards that gave the coordinates of BBC#3 and #4 which were mystery caches. Got it? All along the trail new coordinates were given so you are forced to follow the series in numerical order.

Spring had really arrived and it was great walking along the country lanes and bridal paths that the caches were placed along.

Country lane on BBC trail

I managed to get to BBC#8 which was a letterbox/hybrid cache before my time was up and I had to meet up with my brother again for the evening activities. In the middle of the trail were a couple of JJEF caches, The ATM cache and Bobbing Pot. Our plan for the following day was that with zelger and WKMU3A we would attempt a series of JJEF caches in the morning ending with lunch and that zelger (both members of the team) and I would do a further series in the afternoon.

We met up with three of the potential fourteen members of WKMU3A (not counting zelger who are also members) and started off for Rampant Rhododendron. When we got to GZ it looked as though a tornado had passed through the forest. Not a rhododendron in sight!

Now where is that rhododendron?

We had better luck at Opposites Attract which Bernie was keen to find.

Bernie – Gone fishing

From there we moved on to The Green Hill No. 2 which was a block of wood hung up in a tree with a cable lock on it. There were letters carved on the wood that translated into the code for the lock. The look on everyones faces when they cracked the number at the first attempt was priceless.

Neat construction

The Green Hill No. 3 was equally well constructed. This was a wooden box with a similar kind of lock and a block of wood with numbers on it. It was necessary to divide a huge number with a smaller number to get the code for the lock. I was just pulling up my smartphone in order to work out the answer when one of the U3A team whisked up a calculator out of their bag. A calculator! I haven’t seen one for years!

Locked box

Still dazed by the sight of the calculator we moved on to the remaining caches in the series and The Green Hill No. 4 was even better than the previous three caches that we had found. A padlocked birdbox hanging in a tree had a nearby plastic tube containing the key. I won’t spoil the game by telling you how to get hold of the key but everyone was really wound up by the caches we had found. This was much better than a film canister in an ivy covered tree.

Cache hanging upper right, lock lower centre

We carried on and found a couple more caches by the same owner and DNF’d two more. Can you spot the last cache the group found?

Can you see the cache?

There was a lot of talk over lunch about the experience from the morning and how much fun it had been. So, after lunch both halves of zelger and I set off on the six caches that comrpised the Fifield Frolic series. The trail passed along open and not so open paths in the area. Again, there were no two caches that looked or functioned in same way and all were well made. They were placed four years ago and a lot of growth of the vegetation had occured making some of them a little more well hidden than they would have been when placed.

Overgrown paths

After a full day of JJEF caches we had a quiet evening and spent the Friday morning sorting out the TB’s and geocoins we had found before moving off north towards Sonning Common and FamousEccles Favourite Forty mystery caches!

Typical FF40 beechwood cache

The puzzles I could solve were fun and the caches were located in a beech forest which luckily was still in it’s winter overcoat with little undergrowth. It will be a different story in a few weeks time. As we followed the paths an animal jumped across the path ahead of us. Was it a deer? Or a dog? It ran over to another of it’s kind and I learnt then that it was a muntjac. It’s an Indian deer that is proliferating at a great rate in England and is now quite a pest. I took a photo but it’s not worth publishing.

We also saw other wild animals including this golden pheasant and a rabbit. They didn’t seem to mind each others company.

Golden Pheasant and rabbit

So the day ended with a visit to my brothers daughter and grandson on the way to catching a train to Heathrow and the flight home. The following days were spent logging over a hundred caches and a dozen or more TB’s plus updating my blog. Phew!

END





Transportation – Isle of Man

21 04 2017

After the previous day’s walk from Douglas to Peel, which the GPS tracklog showed us to have been just over 25 km we decided to have a lazy day. The island is known for it’s working museum transport so we walked up to the Electric Tram terminus at the north end of the promenade where we parted with £16 for a day pass on the Manx transportation system. That included travelling on modern buses, the electric trams, horse drawn trams and steam trains. We had already travelled by bus a couple of times and liked the £2:70 single fares.

There are in principle two electric tram lines. The first runs between Douglas and Ramsey in the north and the second runs from Laxey, half way between Douglas and Ramsey, to the top of Snaefell (621 m). The steam trains run from Douglas to Port Erin at the south end of the island. The horse drawn trams run along the promenade from the Electric Tram terminus.

Electric tram at Douglas terminal

Interior of restored tram

A tram pulled into the terminus as we were buying our day passes and a few minutes later we were aboad. It didn’t take long before the tram was full. Not bad for a cold day in April. I wonder what it will be like in summer when that tourist season is in full swing?

We set off at a moderate speed following and crossing back and forth the road to Laxey. The trams are much slower than the usual traffic but have precedence at the road crossings. At Groudle Glen we noted that there was a private Victorian 2ft narrow gauge railway that covered a kilometer or so up the glen. When we arrived at Laxey we got of the tram and got on a waiting tram that is specially built for the steeper incline up to the summit of Snaefell. The route is characterised by having a third central rail that allows a mechanical grip type brake to operate in case the normal motor brake fails.

As we moved out of Laxey we saw the famous Laxey wheel. This is a 22 m diameter water wheel built in 1854 to pump up water from the 460 m deep lead mine (now disused) and still in operation. Signs of mining were seen further up the valley.

Water wheel at Laxey

The wheel at Laxey

Remains of old lead mine

At Snaefell summit we jumped off the tram and rushed up and over the remaining few meters to get to the Six Kingdoms cache so we could get back onto the tram that started it’s downward journey in 30 minutes. It was blowing hard and zelger and I were both pleased that we had hats and gloves with us. Of, course as a radio amateur the masts were of interest and I had listened to traffic on and tried to activate GB3GD and GB3IM-S without success on our walk between Douglas and Peel.

ds8300 at Six Kingdoms

The Snaefell tram at the summit terminus

After spending some minutes at the earthcache twoofnine (two of nine) we jumped back on the tram and rolled back down into Laxey.

View from the journey up Snaefell

On the way down. Note the rope safety brake!

After a few minutes the tram to Douglas appeared and we made our way leisurely back into the main town.

View of Douglas bay from the north

We had intended to take the horse drawn tram along the Promenade but the next tram was too late for us to get to the railway station for our next leg of our travels, so we jumped on a regular bus that wisked us away towards the station. We got off a few stops earlier to log the virtual cache NOW I AM ON MY OWN.

At the station we had just enough time for a quick cup of coffee. We bumped into Steinmann, a geocacher (and radio amateur) from Germany that we had met a couple of days previously at the Meet a Swede event.

Steam train to Port Erin at Douglas Station

No 13 Kissack

ds8300 travelling first class

We chose a first class carriage and enjoyed the leisurely journey into Port Erin. We had time for a short walk (no geocaches in sight) and a pint in the pub opposite the station before making our way back.

Port Erin

Some kilometers out of Port Erin we stopped to swap locomotives with the train coming from Douglas. It seems that loco No13 (Kissack) lives in Port Erin and No 8 (Fenella) in Douglas.

Changing locos

No 8 Fenella

Upon arrival in Douglas we set off towards Manx the islands oldest geocache.

Douglas inner harbour

On the way we passed by the inner harbour and found two urban nanos at Back in Time and Tongue Twister.

We finished off our geocaching with The Isle of Man’s Shortest Multi-cache which wasn’t easy to locate but when zelger triumphantly fished it up from it’s hiding place we both had a laugh. I won’t post any spoiler, but it’s on my list of caches to copy.

So after an evening meal at the same location we used for the event we went back to the hotel and packed ready for the early morning plane to Gatwick and more geocaching adventures.





Heritage Power Trail – Isle of Man

20 04 2017

Isle of Man flag


The last time I visited the Isle of Man was in 1964 and the railways were still in operation. Fast forward to 2016 and I had the notion that I would like to revisit the island and add another geocaching country to my list. I mentioned this to my brother who is half of team “zelger” and he said that this would be a great opportunity for a “lads reunion”. Anyway, time passed and nothing materialised due to everyone having commitments. Finally, in March 2017 I raised the idea again and booked my tickets for Easter 2017. Half of zelger decided that this was not an opportunity to be missed and booked tickets too.

The aim of the trip was twofold. Walk the Heritage Power Trail in a day and spend a day of nostalgia on the electric trams and steam trains on a second day. While we were at it I threw in a geocaching event so we could meet some of the local geocachers. A friendly bunch they were too. The event was Meet a Swede, which isn’t quite a lie as I have dual nationality. Teamkiisseli from Finland were relieved that they were able to speak English not Swedish and didn’t need to discuss ice-hockey.

The Heritage Power Trail crosses the Isle of Man from Douglas in the east to Peel in the west. There are other trails as well but this one seemed to be the definite trail and also gave us the chance to brag that we had walked across the island. After a hearty but early breakfast at our hotel we made our way through Douglas to the start of the trail. Well actually, the end of the trail. Number 1 is in Peel and the last one, number 79 is in Douglas. I had been watching the weather forecast for a few days and it seemed as though we may be in for a wet day. Apart from some light rain early on we had no problems. The sky remained cloudy most of the day but cleared up for a while in the afternoon. There were several information boards along the trail. This was close to Douglas.

Steam Heritage Trail – Douglas to Peel

Our walk together with lunch and a couple of other diversions took all day but was worth it as it gave a nice string of smilies right across the island.

Heritage Power Trail – done in a day!

The majority of the caches were micros, either film canisters placed in nifty little wire baskets on trees and fence post or PET preforms. A few of the caches were larger, notably the TB hotel, the letterbox and the bonus cache.

Bonus cache

Of course, as the trail follows a disused railway line there are no really tough gradients. I think that the highest point we reached was 49 m asl. There were various remains from the days of the active railway, amongst them a couple of rusty bridges like this one.

A rail bridge across a river

The old station at Union Mills has gone along with all the track but there are details available on line for those interested.

Maps of the trail at Union Mills

Historical railway crane at Union Mill

After the third run of micros it was great to find the TB hotel. There was a TB in the box that we picked up and took with us along the trail.

zelger extracting a TB from the trail’s TB hotel

Even though it was overcast and only about 8 degrees C spring was still well on it’s way and there were flowers of all kinds along the trail. These were just some of them.

Plenty of flowers along the trail

Needless to say we were pleased to get to HPT #24 at Tynwald Hill so that we could get lunch. We got there a couple of hours later than expected but a couple of pints of beer to replenish our fluids and a hearty Manx cheese sandwich put us back in good spirits. I had originally planned to find a handful of caches at Tynwald Hill but decided to skip them as we were running late. Tynwald is also the name of the legislature for the island of Ellan Vannin (Isle of Man).

Tynwald Hill – of historic significance for Ellan Vannin (Isle of Man)

As we neared Peel the track followed the River Neb and the scenery changed somewhat. There was plenty of bird life including this heron.

Heron and mill wheel

Heron

After the intial difficulty we had finding HPT #76 the rest of the caches were easily found, until we got to Peel that is. HPT #2 was located at a sign but we couldn’t see anything. As we were searching we heard a voice. “Are you looking for the geocache? It’s in the …” It was a local guy getting something out of a nearby parked car. He saved our day. He had probably given the same hint to others before us too.

Peel Harbour

As we arrived at Peel Harbour we just had HPT #1 to find and that was a nano under a bench. Of course there were four people sitting there but we HAD to find that cache so we told them what we were doing and suddenly there were six people on their hands and knees searching for the cache. We found it after a rather long search much to our relief. All that remained was to get the bus back to Douglas. We had to wait an hour as it was Easter Monday and the busses were not running the regular weekday service. Once on the bus we were back in Douglas ready for dinner in just over half an hour.





Forest trails

11 04 2017

It doesn’t seem so long since I last posted about our trip to Tenerife but nearly a month has passed. Since then I have found a steady stream of caches and planned for a new geocaching adventure that will add a new geocaching country to my list. However, nothing much of the day to day caching has been of great interest. A couple of new forest trails have turned up and my muggle partner and I have enjoyed a few hours walking in the forest along dirt roads. They are good if you wish to get some exercise but showing pictures from a forest with little in way of redeeming features like nice views from hills and over lakes isn’t so enthralling.

Our first walk in the forest was on the “Skogsdoft” trail, #1 – #10. This is a trail some 20 km by road to the west of Gävle.The sun was shining but it was still quite cold in the forest and the road was frozen to a great extent. There was, however, no snow in amongst the trees so getting to the caches was quite easy. We didn’t meet anyone on this walk.

Our second walk in the forest was just a few kilometers to the south of Gävle and here on the “End of the road Trail” we not only found all caches #1 – #10 but we met a fellow geocacher, Paraiba, at the final cache. Cache #4 was placed in a tree by the CO, a tree that had fallen offer for a logging company, so the FTF hunters had quickly passed by. At first sight I can understand why, but suddenly as I looked at the devastation and piles of lopped off branches my eye caught something that was out of place and it turned out to be the log book so this gave me an FTF, which is a rather unusual occurence for me these days.

FTF on a cache that a logging company had destroyed

Our third and final walk was on Sunday and again this was a warm and sunny day. The dirt roads had more or less dried up and once again we bumped into a fellow geocacher, madchicken, who was doing the complete trail från #1-#30 in a clockwise direction whilst we were doing the caches #30 – #11 in an anticlockwise direction. I reality we had planned to walk back the same way that we had come as it was shorter and we needed to revisit a couple of caches where we had failed to find anything. The additional help from Madchicken was a welcome bonus. He found one that I DNF’d on and I found the other so we were both happy.

Madchicken is in there somewhere

There is a great shelter nearby Skogsdoft #27 that has plenty of wood and a stove ready for use. In addtion there was a sign showing the history of the road, that I found to be quite interesting.

Well built shelter near Skogsdoft #27

Information about the forest road

The final short trail I did was “Skogslänk” and this was done by car early on Monday morning on my way to work and netted a further four FTF’s.

The week after Easter will be spent abroad and for those who are interested googling the image of a triskellion may give a clue to which country I mean.





Tenerife

15 03 2017

What could be better than a break from the Swedish winter with a holiday abroad? Somewhere where there was some sun and warmth? A few years ago (2014) we had a weeks holiday on Lanzarote in February and were disappointed by the cool weather (about 15C) that we had. This time we chose Tenerife with a definite geocaching goal in mind and that was to find a cache at a higher altitude than my previous record which is somewhere just under 3000 m. We were not disappointed with the weather either. Every day was between 25 -30 C in the shade due to hot winds blowing in from Africa. I saw that the week after we were there that the temperatures had dropped to around 15C so we were very lucky.

We stayed in Puerto de la Cruz on the northern coast of the island and didn’t find the bus transfer from the airport in the south to be a problem. It gave us some free sightseeing and a feel for what the island looked like. Our arrival day (Sunday) was used to install us in the hotel and eat dinner so no geocaching was on the cards. In fact, with the exception of the cache on Teide there was no real pressure to find caches.

There are not so very many caches in the town but there were a couple that had a high number of favourite points so I made a not of those as potential places to visit. The first cache find was a few hundred metres from the hotel Mirador la Paz which gave us a great view out over the town and the pools at Martianez. From there we walked across town as far as Castillo de San Felipe before returning back to the hotel.

View from Mirador la Paz

Castillo de San Felipe

Tracklog from 20170306 – Walk around Puerto de la Cruz

I had read that there were many walking tracks on the island and on the Tuesday after visiting the botanical gardens we started a walk up the hill towards La Orotava, This was a neat little climb of 337 meters in just over 3 km so a break at Vati was welcomed. The reward for reaching La Orotava was a great tapas lunch.

La Orotrava, a small town 4km up the hill from Puerto de la Cruz

Tracklog from 20170307 – La Orotrava

To get to Teide there are several choices, the easy ones being to rent a car or take a guided tour by bus. As I had just had a shoulder operation driving was out of the question so we took the guided bus tour. That meant missing out on a lot of caches (mostly eathcaches to my big disappointment) along the route but it did get us to the top cable car station on Teide. That was at 3500+ meters. To get to the peak you need a special permit and there were none available for the next couple of months and organised tours with the permit included are only on Sundays which didn’t allow us to take that choice. I thought I wasn’t going to find the micro Mount Teide (3528 m.a.s.l) amongst all the rocks by the path so was very relieved when I did. The second cache Pico del Teide eluded me (and a few others even though it was apparently found the same day I was there.

The Teide volcano as seen from Mirador de la Ruleta

The cable car at Teide takes you up over 1000 m in just a few minutes

The slope up Teide is getting close to 45 degrees. I’m glad there was a cable car!

The crater of Teide is about 45km wide

There are a lot of earthcaches in the area but as we didn’t have a car or possibility to stop the bus we had to be content with logging Piedra de la Rosa / Steinerne Rose) on the fly as the bus drove past and LA TARTA (TENERIFFA) at a rest stop.

Basalt rose stone formation

ds8300 in front of the earthcache La Tarta

Thursday was a lazy day but on Friday we made a 17 km walk along part of the “Ramblas de Castro”, a costal walkway. I would of liked to walk further but the temperature was over 30C so we decided it was not such a good idea without more training first. On the way to the entrance of the walkway we passed through town and found a couple of traditionals, Tree of Life #8 and Loro Parque where I picked up a couple of travelbugs to take back to Sweden.

A cache with TB’s at Loro Parque

When we reached the nature reserve that Ramblas de Castro passes through the first cache on my list was Pirates Treasure / Piratenschatz which by the description and number of favourite points was a fun cache. It was housed in an old deserted water tunnel of which there are thousands on the island. I was expecting a bit of a crawl but I only needed to go in a dozen or so metres before finding the cache. Nice one for kids actually. At about the same place it was possible to log the earthcache EC Erosion at Work and take a few photos.

The coast at Ramblas de Castro

From here we continued on to the island’s cache with the most favourite points – El Gordo (Lost Place). I love both Urban Exploration (UE) and Industrial Architecture and this cache hit the spot. I would have loved to go down to the building but the area was fenced off.

ds8300 with El Gordo (The lost place) in the background

Fascinating old ruins at El Gordo (The lost place)

The locked gate at the top of the path down to El Gordo (The lost place)

The lost place as seen from the locked gate

Tracklog from 20170310 – Ramblas de Castro

I found a couple more caches during the week but all in all, we had a lazy time and recharged our batteries in the best possible manner.





Belated geocaching targets 2017

30 01 2017

I’m not going to make it hard for myself this year. I am rolling over targets from 2016 as I didn’t meet most of them last year. Some of them are easy and target #3 will no doubt be fun but the last target is one that will demand more diligence and hard work I’m sure. Anyway here is the short list that I have.

1. Find at least one cache in Norrland.
2. Find at least one cache in ten new boroughs of Sweden.
3. Find caches in at least three more countries.
4. Find at least ten more earthcaches.
5. Place at least three new caches with different D/T ratings or types.
6. Find the 3 remaining puzzle caches to complete the Questionable COs: A-Z Roll of Honour Challenge.








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