KBT

9 08 2016

It all began about a month ago. A few caches on a new trail were published in Gävle in mid June, just before we went away on vacation to Iceland and as a consequence no hunt was made until we got back home. In fact, the six first caches in the series KBT (Kungsbäck Trail is my guess) were just about the only caches I found before we left for Jersey. In the beginning there were just a handful of caches on the trail but it has successively been expanded to that today there are forty caches and more anticipated.

Most of the dots are on the KBT trail

Most of the dots are on the KBT trail

So what’s special about this trail? Nothing as such except that I have visited the area six times so far and still have ten more caches left to find. Kungsbäck is a former military area and is more or less closed off to car traffic and demands the use of a bike or shanks’ pony to get around. I have been lazy and stopped by on my way home from work and grabbed a couple or three caches before continuing on.

On the geobike

On the geobike

I made an effort to find the remaining caches last week by grabbing the geobike and biking to Gävle Bro then in to the trail. I gave up the hunt as I neared the southern end of the trail and biked home due to the torrential rain that decided to visit the area. I don’t mind getting wet but what usually happens is that the log books get wet too and that’s no fun for the next hunter.

Nonetheless, the visits to the trail have been pleasant and I have seen some of the wild life. I nearly cycled over an adder somewhere after KBT-24 which was sunning itself on the track but when I stopped to take the photo it wriggled off into the grass.

An adder on the track

An adder on the track

As I was nearing KBT-25 I noticed a wooden gate in the bushes and because of my curiosity I stopped to see why. There was what seemed to be a man made pool about 10 x 20 m and a little jetty sticking out into it. Why? Who made it, when and what is it’s purpose? Anyone know?

A weird little pool. Anyone  know how it got there and why?

A weird little pool. Anyone know how it got there and why?

By now I still had many caches left to find so returned to Gävle Bro again the day after and this time on foot I looked for KBT-16 to KBT-9, only failing to find KBT-10. Of course, it was found the day after. Grr. As I was nearing KBT-9 where I turned around I saw a baby thrush on the track, and it was still there a few minutes later when I returned. I hope it’s parent was looking after it.

A baby thrush on the track

A baby thrush on the track

So guess what I am going to do after work today? I hope to be able to find KBT-31 to KBT-40. If I am lucky this could be drive in caching. If I am not it will be a 5 km walk.





Husbyringen

25 07 2016

A couple of months ago we visited Stjärnsund where were enjoyed a walk around the lake collecting a handful of caches along the way. I said then that I would return during my summer vacation to do some of the power trails in the area. The most significant one after Dalälven PT (115 caches most of which I have done) is Husbyringen (111 caches) followed by VTIH16 (30 caches). Things didn’t work out as planned due to a bout of food poisoning that knocked me out for the last few days of my summer vacation, so my day in southern Dalarna didn’t occur until the weekend after my first week back at work.

We started at Husbyringen #30 as it was the first one we reached from our home in Gävle. I am pretty certain I have stopped here earlier on some geocaching trip to Hedemora or similar and signed the log but not logged it on the site. As there was a new log strip in the cache I couldn’t confirm that so it will just be one of those nagging thoughts that pops up in my mind from time to time.

PRESS STOP. Looking through my GSAK database of finds has solved the nag. On 2014-05-24 I found GC3RR6B Husbyringen by Knatos, now archived.

The first few caches were quickly logged before we made a detour from the PT to Silvehytteå and the canal. A perfect time to have a coffee break too. Silvhytteå canal joins the lakes Fullen and Grycken which formed part of an important water transport system between Edsken, Silvhytteå, Stjärnsund and Långshyttan during the heydays of iron making in the area.

Silver birches with nodules and the lake Fullen in the background

Silver birches with nodules and the lake Fullen in the background

Silvhytteå furnace

Silvhytteå furnace

Silvhytteå canal with passing boats

Silvhytteå canal with passing boats

There was plenty of activity in the locks during the time we were there. My first visit to Silvhytteå was probably around 2006-07-02 when I found GCWV8B The Ring # 4 Silfhytteå by ohrn, again long since archived.

So off again and towards Stjärnsund where we had planned to stop for lunch. The outdoor temperature was now in the high twenties and in the car over thirty as soon as I turned off the AC. Our lunch stop in Stjärnsund was to grab the “tunnbröds rulle med extra allt” that we ate on our last visit (It’s a thin chapatti like bread with a couple of hot dogs, mashed potatoes, fried onions and shrimp salad.)
It was apparently a market day so the place was swarming with muggles and the queue for food was long.

As soon as we could we left and continued on the trail as the temperature soared. It felt like the time we were on the ET Highway but more humid. We kept on until we reached Kloster where I last visited on 2006-07-02 to find GCWV8K The Ring # 7 Klosters krutbruk. So ten years on and I am revisiting Husbyringen, the main difference being the huge difference in the number of caches between then and now.

We decided when we reached Kloster than we had done enough and headed off to Långshyttan for an ice cream then home. I hope to get back soon and put a few more smilies on to the map.

Husbyringen is now about half done

Husbyringen is now about half done





Guernsey

14 07 2016

The ferry journey from St Helier, Jersey to St Peter Port on Guernsey only took an hour but it was enough time to enjoy a quick lunch onboard. We could see coming into port that St Peter Port was much smaller than St Helier and had a much steeper profile. We found out how steep as we walked up from the ferry with our luggage, which luckily was wheeled. We stopped on the way to find Dandilly’s Wedding series: The Transport but the DVD case that was the cache container had slid into it’s hiding slot and needed a revisit with appropriate tools to extract it.

View of St Peter Porting from the Jersey ferry

View of St Peter Porting from the Jersey ferry

After puffing up the hill and checking into our hotel we decided to do some exploring and walked the kilometer or so down to town. We were pretty close to Rooftop View but there was just a slight hinder. We had to walk back up 126 steep steps to get there. Phew!

View over St Peter Port from "Rooftop View"

View over St Peter Port from “Rooftop View”

After a great evening meal we walked back up to the hotel. The morning after started with drizzle that turned into rain so by the time we got to the bus terminus we were rather wet. Because of the poor weather we jumped on a 91 bus and for the princely sum of £1 each we had a two hour round island trip. On the way we saw the sign to Little Chapel so once we got back to the bus terminus we forked out another pound to get the bus there. We were so interested in the chapel I forgot to look for the cache that was there. Looking at the clue I am certain I was just within centimeters of the cache. Duh!

Entering the Little Chapel

Entering the Little Chapel

Inside the Little Chapel

Inside the Little Chapel

Detail on the wall of the "Little Chapel"

Detail on the wall of the “Little Chapel”

The weather cleared up and when we got back to St Peter Port we started to look for Twixt. Not as easy as it should have been. There was a protest meeting in the park – something about building a car park there – so we waited until they were done beforestarting our hunt. The GPS pointed me just inside the park boundary and then outside it. We walked round the block before discovering a small path three quarters of the way round. Once we were in the right spot the cache was an easy find.

A protest meeting delayed our search for "Twixt"

A protest meeting delayed our search for “Twixt”

Beautiful hanging baskets were everywhere

Beautiful hanging baskets were everywhere

We paid a visit to Victor Hugo’s home which is now a museum. What a strange taste that man had, dark and egocentric. We passed by this interesting sign.

We couldn't find a cache in La Cache

We couldn’t find a cache in La Cache

We also had the opportunity to watch some of the soap box derby which was quite fun. No-one got hurt but a few of the “cars” got damaged and lost wheels on the way down over the ramps.

Soap box derby in St Peter Port

Soap box derby in St Peter Port

Our final cache find in my forty fourth caching country was at Victoria Tower which you can see to the right of the first photograph above.

Victoria tower and a captured German field gun

Victoria tower and a captured German field gun

Both Guernsey and Jersey are very different. Guernsey felt a bit too small and compact for my liking but it was great to have visited both the islands. We stayed in London for a couple of days on our way home but did no active geocaching. Food poisoning in London had me decked for the last four days of my vacation then it was work again. With the exception of an hour’s geocaching in Sweden after our trip to Iceland I haven’t done any during the vacation. I had great plans but the result of the food poisoning put paid to those. I wonder where our next trip will be?





Jersey

10 07 2016

You would expect that a four week summer vacation would be ideal for geocaching but in my case it seems that life gets in the way. After a great week on Iceland I had about ten days at home and only had an hour to hunt for caches. It was on the spur of the moment so that was without my GPS, just my iPhone 4S (I’m too cheap to upgrade) and the official geocaching app, which is nothing great. As usual too much “lull lull” and eye candy for the masses. I hope it improves. What I was able to do in that hour was to find the first six caches in the new KBT trail in Gävle. Apart from that I haven’t done any geocaching at home.

Then came another trip away from home and the opportunity to add a new geocaching country to my list! I had heard that the channel islands were a nice holiday destination so we decided to visit Jersey, Guernsey and England in one trip. It’s not cheap in the summer as it is a holiday destination for many and there are so many local transports involved. There isn’t a cheap charter option from Sweden that I know of.

We flew from Arlanda to London Gatwick on Norwegian keeping our fingers crossed that there wouldn’t be a cancellation. Everything worked well and the flight was on time. We had a few hours to kill at Gatwick but as we had to pick up our luggage, transfer from the one terminal to the other, check in with British Airways and eat lunch the time was filled with activity. Arriving at Jersey aiport was in diametric contrast to Gatwick. It’s a minute airport! We grabbed the bus into St Helier and made our way up to the hotel where we were pleasantly surprised to find that we had been upgraded to a suite. Way to go!

We were also relieved to find dry sunny weather, which we were worried about as it had rained there every day in the week up to our departure from Sweden. After spending an afternoon sightseeing in the rather compact town of St Helier (pop 28,310) and not coming across a single cache in the city centre that wasn’t a multi with a GZ way off the starting point we called it a day then the next after a hearty breakfast we decided to walk to Le Hocq

Looking towards Jersey Tides earthcache

Looking towards Jersey Tides earthcache

This is a walk of about 4 km and gave us the cache to find find a couple of traditionals and an earthcache at Green Island – Jersey Tides -on the way.

Low tide from "Green Island"

Low tide from “Green Island”

At Le Hocq there is one of the thirty plus towers built towards the end of the 1800’s to warn of impending attacks from the French. This one in Le Hocq is on the reverse of Jersey’s £1 notes. Yes, they have their own currency even though UK pounds are valid there but not the reverse even though they are on parity from a monetary value point of view.

One of the thirty odd watchtowers from the late 1800's

One of the thirty odd watchtowers from the late 1800’s

One good thing about Jersy is that you can get a day pass on the buses for £7.50 and a trip around the island only takes a couple of hours. We used it to get to St Aubin which is a small village with a picturesque harbour.

St Aubin harbour

St Aubin harbour

View south from St Aubin

View south from St Aubin

From St Aubin, we jumped back on the bus and continued on to Corbière Lighthouse, where I found Corbière Lighthouse Viewpoint. The earthcache La Corbière was not accessible due to high tides. The height difference between low and high tide is over 9 m making it the second greatest in the world. There is an unbelievable focus on the German occupation of the island during the second world war that I found to be rather excessive. There are still bunkers all over the place and many are now tourist traps. The place would look a lot better if most of the concrete blocks dotted around the island were removed.

One of many types of WWII fortifications on the island

One of many types of WWII fortifications on the island

A cache find at Corbière

A cache find at Corbière

One of the local inhabitants at Corbière

One of the local inhabitants at Corbière

La Corbière Lighthouse with the tidal causeway just visible

La Corbière Lighthouse with the tidal causeway just visible

From here we continued on north to the small harbour at Greve de Lecq where we found Greve de Lecq Tower. The bus then headed back to St Helier where we jumped off then got on a bus to St Catherine on the east coast. We stopped for afternoon tea in Gorey which is another picturesque harbour at the foot of the impressive Mont Orgeuil Castle. A short walk to a secluded beach lead us to Petit Paw a letterbox hybrid.

Petit Paw letterbox hybrid

Petit Paw letterbox hybrid

As our short stay was not focussed on geocaching except to be able to tick off a new geocaching country making this number forty three, we only found nine caches, but enjoyed a relaxing stay on the island. From Jersey we took the ferry to the smaller island of Guernsey which has quite a different character.

Leaving St Helier with Elizabeth castle in the background

Leaving St Helier with Elizabeth castle in the background

Food for thought?

Food for thought?





Southern Iceland

25 06 2016

We were now more than half way through our stay on Iceland and of the thirty one caches we had found eight of them were earthcaches. During the remaining days we were able to clock up a further twenty eight caches of which fourteen were earthcaches. The focus on earthcaches was by choice as I really enjoy them and Iceland has a fantastic geology that makes that part of geocaching really fun. The only downside of things is that it takes much longer than normal to log all the caches. I hate reading “TFTC” logs on my caches and will always write something meaningful in my logs and give as complete as possible answers to the owners of earthcaches.

Now we decided to tempt fate and visit the attractions on the Golden Circle which of course meant rubbing shoulders with bus load after bus load of muggle tourists. On that particular day we found ten earthcaches and two traditional caches . I can understand why Þingvellir, Geysir and Gullfossen are major attraactions in Iceland and as they are pretty close to Reykjavik they are ideal for the masses to visit. We had to elbow our way forward on the viewing platform at Þingvellir and there wasn’t a chance that we could take any photos without hoards of people in them. The only thing that surprised me was that it was possible to find a regular cache, Thing Sites: Thingvellir Lögberg, right in the middle of the area in plain sight of many hundreds of muggles without anyone paying the slightest bit of attention. I have never seen such a concentration of selfie-sticks before. Adonis, move over.

Visiting Þingvellir with bus loads of tourists

Visiting Þingvellir with bus loads of tourists

Between Þingvellir and Geysir we made a slight detour on a pretty rough road to find Do you know Pillow Lava? and had the added bonus of seeing where a family had lived in a cave – in relatively modern times – and overheard muggle Swedish tourists at the sign explaining in Swedish that it was a near relative to them that had been born in the cave. Amazing.

The Icelanders who lived in a cave

The Icelanders who lived in a cave

The pillow lava was just as amazing but in a completely different way. Imagining that the area was under water during the eruption of the volcano was hard to fathom. For me, this was one of the highlights of the trip. I have seen large waterfalls and glaciers all over the world but never pillow lava!

Close up of pillow lava.

Close up of pillow lava.

Pillow lava earthcache.

Pillow lava earthcache.

We then carried on to Geysir where we spent ages waiting for the geyser Stokkur to spout and missing it several times. In the end the batteries in my camera packed up so I had to do with the photos I got at the tail end of a spout.. Very impressive formation though.

The geyser Stukkor in action

The geyser Stukkor in action

Our next stop, of course, was Gullfossen. We were after all on the Golden Circle following the tourist hoards. It is a mighty waterfall and when the rainbows are present it is worth its name of Golden falls.

Gullfossen

Gullfossen

Our Golden Circle tour differed a little from the commercial offerings that we made a detour to the Grindavik, to look at the soon to disappear NRTF station then on to the Blue Lagoon where again there were hundreds of muggles queing to bathe in the translucent milk white stinky waters.

Cocktails at the Blue Lagoon

Cocktails at the Blue Lagoon

Lava field Illahraun at the Blue Lagoon

Lava field Illahraun at the Blue Lagoon

On our final full day in Iceland we were a little undecided as to whether we would drive north towards Hraunfossar where the water is ejected from the side of the fells or if we should visit a glacier. As we had already seen a number of waterfalls the choice fell on the Sólheimajökull glacier to the south.

We stopped by the side of the road before reaching the turnoff to the Sólheimajökull glacier and read on the sign that we were at the foot of the now infamous Eyafjallajökull. There were photographs to show the area before during and after the eruption in 2010 of the volcano under the glacier, that caused so many difficulties for air travellers over most of Europe and even further afield. My brother and fellow geocacher, zelger, with family got trapped on Madeira only to be “rescued” by a luxury cruise liner that took them back to the UK in style, all inclusive. I am stilll green with envy.🙂

I have finally learnt how to say Eyafjallajökull!

I have finally learnt how to say Eyafjallajökull!

Don't pass this sign!

Don’t pass this sign!

The glacier Sólheimajökull.

The glacier Sólheimajökull.

We also wanted to see something that is typically Icelandic and that it the puffin. We read that there were colonies at Dyrhólaey so we continued on in that direction. There was a cache at the turn off from the main road, Li’l Dyrholaey 2 with a guardian that was very curious about what I was doing.

A curious muggle

A curious muggle

The area at Dyrhólaey has two parking spots, both with fantastic views and interesting geological formations. Well worth the visit. The road up to the upper parking was a bit rough but our rental car did a great job. I wouldn’t have taken my car up there! The only puffins we saw were in flight at long distance so we didn’t see their characteristic beaks which was a shame.

The black sands at Dyrhólaey

The black sands at Dyrhólaey

Sea arch at Dyrhólaey

Sea arch at Dyrhólaey

The lighthouse at Dyrhólaey

The lighthouse at Dyrhólaey

One thing that we couldn’t fail to notice in the country was the presence of lupins, not the ones we are used to but Lupinus nootkatensis, the Nootka lupine, which is native to North America. They have become a problem and seing the extent that they cover the ground in some areas I can understand it.

Lupins as far as the eye can see.

Lupins as far as the eye can see.

Our final stop on our southern journey was at Vik and the closeby Reynisdrangar, a rock formation that of course has a few folk stories attached to it.

The rock formation Reynisdrangar.

The rock formation Reynisdrangar.

We stopped in Selfoss on the way back to Reykjavik where we found a couple of traditional caches and the earthcache Unusual Geological Formations: Ölfusá.

A pseudocrater at Ölfusá

A pseudocrater at Ölfusá

Rather than drive back the same way to Reykjavik we made a detour and found this little pearl on the coast – Strandarkirkja. The local community had made a very interesting map over the area that they had posted in the church car park. Visit it!

The little church at Strandarkirkja

The little church at Strandarkirkja

View of the Atlantic from Strandarkirkja

View of the Atlantic from Strandarkirkja

Fom here we visited our final earthcache which was a 1,3 km long lava tube of impressive proportions – Raufarholshellir. From the photo you can see that the basalt “roof” is not that thick and has very pronounced cracks between the basalt coumns. There are, however, some very impressive ice formations in the tube so with the right equipment this is a great place to visit.

The gigantic lava tube Raufarholshellir.

The gigantic lava tube Raufarholshellir.

So that was Iceland in a one week visit summarised in three short chapters. Was it worth the €2500 we paid for the week? Yes, but not if you compare it financially with a week in Croatia or the Canary Islands. There is an fantastic nature to explore and sights that you won’t find anywhere else, all in a fairly compact area. The beer is tasty but at the prices they charge you are better to abstain. Would I go again. Yes, definitely, if I win some big money.





Northern Iceland

22 06 2016

Originally, I wanted to visit the fjords in the north west part of Iceland but quickly realised that in the time that we had available that we wouldn’t be able to do so. Another area I wanted to see was Akureyri with it’s botanical gardens and the area around Myvatn which had a fair number of earthcaches and thus surely an interesting geology and topology. We realised that the most practical way was in a rental car and I picked this up at the airport a couple of days after our arrival. The 380 km journey to Akureryi was on pretty good roads that included a 6 km long tunnel under Hvalfjördur, that shortens the 65 km drive around the fjord. However, on the way back to Reykjavik we chose to drive around.

A statue in the middle of nowhere

A statue in the middle of nowhere

Wild Icelandic horses

Wild Icelandic horses

We chose to stay in a guesthouse in the centre of Akureyri and found it very comfortable. Our evening meal was really fresh sushi from a local restaurant. The day after we headed east to the Myvatn and Dettifoss area where there were many earthcaches to log. Our first experience of the mighty waterfalls on Iceland was here at Godafoss. It was on a fine day and the photos turned out quite well in addition to giving me both a traditional Godafoss Cache and an earthcache Genesis of Goðafoss.

Godafossen

Godafossen

When we reached Myvatn we were greated by a fantasy like environment with pseudocraters forming islands in the lake and crazy jagged lava formations forming a foreground to a huge volcano that we unfortunately didn’t have time to climb up.

Dimmuborgir

Dimmuborgir

I parked the car about three hundred meters from Dimmuborgir and headed off towards the cache. I noticed a guy coming from that direction and guessed correctly that it was a geocacher. He hadn’t found the cache so returned with me so we could look together. We found it without too great difficulty and then after a chat went on our different ways only to bump into each other again later in the day.

Dimmuborgir where I met the geocacher ah_toermalijn

Dimmuborgir where I met the geocacher ah_toermalijn

We intended to have a hot bath at Myvatn but the cold biting wind put us off. At least we got to see a few earthcaches in the area including Gervigígur / Pseudokrater / pseudocrater – Myvatn, Myvatn Nature Baths, Hverir Iceland and Víti at Krafla

Hot baths at Myvatn

Hot baths at Myvatn

Pseudocraters at Myvatn

Pseudocraters at Myvatn

A busy fumarole

A busy fumarole

Mud pools at Hverir

Mud pools at Hverir

Viti crater at Krafla

Viti crater at Krafla

After the visit to Myvatn and surrounding points of interest we drove on to Dettifoss, which is a really impressive waterfall, purporting to be the largest in terms of volume in Europe. We also walked upstream a kilometer or so to the little sister waterfall at Selfoss. The volume of water is the same of course but not the fall height.. We were at the wrong side of the gorge to be able to log the earthcache but we did find a simple trad at the carpark, Island-2013 MSB.

Dettifoss

Dettifoss

Dettifoss and a visitor

Dettifoss and a visitor

Selfoss - somewhat smaller than Dettifoss

Selfoss – somewhat smaller than Dettifoss

From Dettifoss we started our drive back to Akureyri via Husavik, which is a fishing industry influenced town on the north coast. Here we ate a great fish dinner and grabbed a couple of caches – Husavik: the whale museum and Switzerland in Iceland in the charming small town.

An old snowmobile at Husavik

An old snowmobile at Husavik

Husavik harbour

Husavik harbour

Gamli Baukur restaurant at the harbour in Husavik

Gamli Baukur restaurant at the harbour in Husavik

We arrived back in Akureyri late in the evening but it was still light of course. After a good night’s sleep we started our journey back to Reykjavik by visiting the unusual church, and the botanical gardens, Lystigarður Akureyrar before leaving Akureyri.

Akureyri Church

Akureyri Church

Akureyri botanical gardens

Akureyri botanical gardens

On our way up to Akureyri we had noticed an earthcache at Grábrók Crater, but decided to leave it until the journey back to Reykjavik. I’m really pleased we stopped here and walked up to the top and round the periphery of the crater. It reminded me of the time I did the Tongariro Crossing but on a much smaller scale.

Kotárgil - one of many ravines

Kotárgil – one of many ravines

Grábrók Crater that we walked up and around the top

Grábrók Crater that we walked up and around the top

Another detour we made was to Akranes which is another fishing town. After that we decided that we would drive around Hvalfjordur, despite it adding more than 60 km to our journey so we could see more of the country.

Colourful rocks at Akranes

Colourful rocks at Akranes

Akranes new lighthouse

Akranes new lighthouse

This is where we found the toughest earthcache of our visit, in fact the toughest trek. It took us up and down steep paths with rope handrails, through caves and across rivers. The earthcache was at the waterfall Glymur.

The path went through a cave...

The path went through a cave…

...and across a bridge

…and across a bridge

Glymur - one of the highest waterfalls

Glymur – one of the highest waterfalls

After that adventure and on somewhat shaky legs we decided that we had had enough excitement for the day and headed back to Reykjavik without any more detours.





Independence Day

18 06 2016

When I booked our vacation in Iceland a couple of months ago I had no idea that 17th June was Icelands Independence Day. We left home at an unearthly hour in order to get the 8 am flight from Arlanda to Keflavik. It’s only a 2 hour 45 minute flight so not much longer than flying to London. We arrived on time but had to wait ages for the Express bus to collect all the passengers that had reserved seats only to be dropped off at Hallgrims church as the already paid for hotel drop off service wasn’t possible as it was claimed that the police had forbidden traffic in the city centre. The shuttle bus that dropped us off passed right by our hotel. Duh. Once we had checked in to our hotel which was right on Laugavegur, the main street in the “old Town” we went out to explore the city and saw Islandic flags all over the place and quite a few people dressed in traditional dress. Our first find, Draumur hafsins, was at one of the largest containers I have seen for some time and in a place where stealth was impossible so a direct line of action was the best one.

Wall painting as backdrop to Draumur Hafsins

Wall painting as backdrop to Draumur Hafsins

Draumur Hafsins was the largest cache container I have seen in a while

Draumur Hafsins was the largest cache container I have seen in a while

We then had an attempt at Meeting In The Middle which we DNF’d then read logs that the cache was about 30 m off. A second attempt proved that right so I added the corrected coords to my log. I wonder if the CO will do anything about it as it is an owner with just 11 finds who hasn’t logged into the site for over nine months.

Höfði - the site of the 1986 talks between Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev

Höfði – the site of the 1986 talks between Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev

Sculpture at Höfði

Sculpture at Höfði

From there we walked along the sea front passing by the stainless steel sculpture of a boat. Sólfar where the cache was quickly found.

Unusual sculpture and unusual cache container

Unusual sculpture and unusual cache container

As we approached the City Lake we saw lots of market stands and then a brass band started playing. I imagine that some more activities were planned but it all seemed quite low key. That was something that was completely different when Iceland were playing their matches in the football EM

Independence day parade

Independence day parade

A very packed place when Iceland was playing football

A very packed place when Iceland was playing football

We enjoyed walking through the old city centre as it is very compact as opposed to greater Reykjavik which is really spread out. The main tourist street is Laugavegir where we were staying which in addition to shops had many cafes, restaurants and bars. My beer consuption dropped to nearly zero as paying over 100 SEK for a beer isn’t worth it.

Every city has it's fair share of graffiti

Every city has it’s fair share of graffiti

Anyone lost a glove?

Anyone lost a glove?

Interesting decor on a house in Laugavegur

Interesting decor on a house in Laugavegur

As we planned to stay in Reykjavik for a couple of days before moving on we didn’t have a rental car from day one to keep rental and parking costs down but took the bus into town then I took the bus back to pick up the rental car. In general rental car prices in Iceland seem high but we found a provider (Geysir) who charged about 400 SEK/day for a Nissan Micro which suited our pockets. When I got their they upgraded the car to a Hyundai Tucson – a 4WD SUV. Nice. What would have been even nicer would have been one of the real Icelandic 4WD monster jeeps. I quite fancied a Landrover Defender as a basic utility vehicle.

We paid for a Nissan Micra and got a Hyundai Tucsan - nice upgrade

We paid for a Nissan Micra and got a Hyundai Tucsan – nice upgrade

This was a mild version of an Icelandic 4WD.

This was a mild version of an Icelandic 4WD.

I parked the car a few hundred meters closer to the airport and walked over to find TAKE OFF TO THE RAINBOW’S END before setting off on the 45 minute drive to Reykjavik.

Rainbow sculpture at the airport

Rainbow sculpture at the airport

A very well visited cache at the airport

A very well visited cache at the airport

We left Reykjavik a couple of days later for a trip to Akureyri and the northern part of the island, which I will write about in my next post, to return to Reykjavik and more trips in the southern part of the island. There aren’t so many caches in the centre of the town and a couple of them including MINOR were found on our second visit which coincided with the longest day of the year. Even though we have long summer days in Gävle we noticed the difference.

One of the few steam locomotives on the island

One of the few steam locomotives on the island

Midnight sun in Reykjavik on the longest day of the year

Midnight sun in Reykjavik on the longest day of the year

Apart from the earthcaches at Geysir and Gullfossen the cache with the most favourite points is in Rekjavik and got a favourite point from me for it’s creativity. >In a crevice among some large rocks … is a stainless steel box with an inscription attached in some way to the ground between two boulders on the shore front where it is in plain sight and seen by muggles all the time. I extracted the box and signed the log as people were passing by. They stopped and looked at the inscription but ignored what I was doing completely!

The cache name is inscribed on the camo!

The cache name is inscribed on the camo!








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